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Nestled close to the Phoenix Park, Cumiskey’s offers old world charm….modern sophistication and style. Our aim is to provide you the hospitality, comfort and service you deserve. This establishment has been built on the remains of an old inn steeped in legend stretching back as far as the 17th century. In Cromwellian times, Cromwell parked his army horses along this side of the Phoenix Park.

During the 1850′s a monk escaped from Grangegorman and hid in the loft of the bar for ten months and during the nights when the inn keeper and his wife where asleep, he would sneak down and help himself in regard to food and drink. Unfortunately for him, one evening he had a bit too much drink and the landlord heard him singing his head off at the top of his voice and had him arrested.

Cricket was a big thing in the late 1890′s and in the Phoenix Park on the 26th June 1896 W. D. Grace, the world’s greatest batsman, was playing a game of cricket less than 500 yard from where this pub stands today. It was a warm afternoon and having the best batting day of his life, he ran off the green and came to the inn which stood on the very spot where Cumiskeys now stands. The whole team followed him, for in those days, the Phoenix Park had over 40 cricket pitches. It was entered in his diary:

“We dined and drank lavishly in this monumental bar with its comfortable mix of easy chairs and settess, alongside stewards, hangmewn, highwaymen, smugglers, merchants, farmers, travellers and other fellow cricketers, who stopped off to slake their thirst, refresh their horses and revive their spirits for the road ahead. This was a great finish to a fine day and a glorious victory. We entertained ourselves late into the night and saw several of the ghosts this handsome inn is rumoured to house”

Todays at Cumiskey’s we still like to feel that we are maintaining the tradition of fine food, drink and entertainment amongst friends for all to be had. To enjoy a drink in Cumiskey’s is to communicate with time itself, for it is to this very day, still a monumental bar.